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From 1746 - 1749 three Spanish missions and a presidio were built in the area by Spanish missionaries, mission Indians and a Garrison of Spanish soldiers. The Spaniards goals were to Christianize and civilize the numerous Indian tribes in the area and to establish a presence, in this region, ahead of the French.  

They also were constructing a rock dam and a system of acequias (canals) just east of Apache Pass to irrigate the mission fields ¼ mile southeast of here.  The stones are said to have been used in the construction of the San Gabriel School in 1935. 

Apache Pass, named by the early Spanish Explorers, is the gravel bar crossing here on the San Gabriel River that was used for centuries by Native American Indians then by explorers, settlers, and local farmers and ranchers for many reasons.  A short distance north of the crossing there are tracks remaining in the native pasture identifying the old trail. 

This crossing, that is still used by farmers today, was the crossing used prior to the existing iron bridge which was built in 1912.  Prior to this date, the path took a NNE route out of the river bottom to higher ground where numerous huts and later houses were built.  Presently, County Road 428 heads north from the bridge to where, in 1925, the Worley Cotton Gin and its trade store were built.  The store remains standing today.  Across the road from the store is a granite marker erected in 1936 by the State of Texas telling of the Spanish Missions in the area. 

The property was purchased by the Worley family in the late 1800s and remains in the family. 

In 2004, FM 908 was identified as part of the Upper El Camino Real, a National  Historical Trail from Mexico to Louisiana.    

The “Apache Pass” Group is very aware of what the American Indians did for America. They were here centuries before the “white man”.  We keep this in mind and humble ourselves here on their homeland.

We look back and understand and feel for their plight.  America did move on, but not without sacrifice by all. We recognize that we all had a part and all are to be commended. 

The American Indians were simply trying to protect their homeland just as our United States is trying to protect ours now.

Kit Worley 2004 founder / Apache Pass River Theatre.

for San Gabriel History click here

Apache Pass / 9112 N. FM 908 / Rockdale, TX. 76567

General Info apachepass@tex1.net